Montague Redknap

Posted by on March 6, 2010 at 11:49 am.

Montague Redknap was born in 1886 and was from West Norwood ( now known as Lambeth ) and married in St. Martin’s-in-the-Field, just off Trafalgar Square in London, in 1913. He married Miss Alice R. Houghton, of Southport. Its possible he is a relative, but I haven’t been able to go far enough back to check this. if you know any information about him, I would love to know.

Below is a film he made travelling from Leeds to Quetta in Pakistan.

He is mentioned in a few places on the web and I was lucky enough to have two stories forwarded from a long lost cousin in Australia.

The Mercury (Hobart). Tuesday 10 June 1913. Page 4.

Mr. Montague Redknap, of West Norwood, who was married last month at St. Martin’s-in-the-Field, Trafalgar-square, to Miss Alice R. Houghton, of Southport, met his wife as the result of motoring without goggles, says the “Daily Mirror.” He became temporarily blind, and was sent to Newmarket Hospital, where for some weeks he had to lie with his eyes bandaged. Though unable to see her he at once fell in love with the voice of the nurse whose duty it was to look after him. In due course the bandages were taken off the patient’s eyes, and he found that his nurse was quite as attractive as her voice had led him to believe she would be. Before he left the hospital, Miss Houghton had promised to become his Bride.

( I love this story ! )

The Argus (Melbourne). Friday 1 May 1925. Page 19.

North Australia, British Expedition, London, April 29.

Mr. M. Terry, who drove a motor-car across Australia last year, and his colleagues, Mr. R. A. Prescott, topographical survey expert, and Mr. M. Redknap, cinematographer, were the guests at Luncheon of the Guy Motors Co., which is providing cars for an expedition in North Australia. The chairman (Mr. Sydney Guy), who proposed the toast of the expedition, said that the “all-British project” would traverse 3,000 miles, of which 500 would be across unknown territory.

Mr. Terry said that in addition to Mr. Prescott and Mr. Redknap, a member of the House of Commons would accompany the expedition, and two other persons would be picked up in Australia. Two caterpillar motor-cars and a motor-cycle would be used.

The Agent-General for Western Australia (Mr. Colebatch) said that he hoped that more rapid and cheaper transport would be provided for developing the unoccupied north.

He was a cinematographer who went on an expedition from Darwin to Broome with Michael Terry in 1925. Terry was also born in England but spend most of his life exploring the outback of Australia, mainly by car. He wrote a number of books ( which I will try and track down ).

I have also found mention of him here at I have mailed the site to see if they have any more information.

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